Monday, March 3, 2008

blow ye the trumpet, blow

Each day of Lent I am publishing one of Charles Wesley's hymns or poems. In my experience, the selection of Charles Wesley's hymns that we actually use in worship is very small. This is sad, because his hymns are filled with deep theological truths and great beauty.

Use these as a part of your Lenten disciplines, and share any thoughts or reactions in the comments.


Lent Day 23

Blow Ye the Trumpet, Blow
(United Methodist Hymnal #379)

1.
Blow ye the trumpet, blow!
The gladly solemn sound
let all the nations know,
to earth's remotest bound:
The year of jubilee is come!
The year of jubilee is come!
Return, ye ransomed sinners, home.

2.
Jesus, our great high priest,
hath full atonement made;
ye weary spirits, rest;
ye mournful souls, be glad:
The year of jubilee is come!
The year of jubilee is come!
Return, ye ransomed sinners, home.

3.
Extol the Lamb of God,
the all atoning Lamb;
redemption in his blood
throughout the world proclaim.
The year of jubilee is come!
The year of jubilee is come!
Return, ye ransomed sinners, home.

4.
Ye slaves of sin and hell,
your liberty receive,
and safe in Jesus dwell,
and blest in Jesus live:
The year of jubilee is come!
The year of jubilee is come!
Return, ye ransomed sinners, home.

5.
Ye who have sold for nought
your heritage above
shall have it back unbought,
the gift of Jesus' love:
The year of jubilee is come!
The year of jubilee is come!
Return, ye ransomed sinners, home.

6.
The gospel trumpet hear,
the news of heavenly grace;
and saved from earth, appear
before your Savior's face:
The year of jubilee is come!
The year of jubilee is come!
Return to your eternal home.

2 comments:

Geoffrey Kruse-Safford said...

I love this stanza:
"Ye slaves of sin and hell,
your liberty receive,
and safe in Jesus dwell,
and blest in Jesus live:"

There was a long-standing dogma that, on Holy Saturday, Jesus descended to hell and offered salvation not only to the damned, but to all there. Those who continued to refuse the offer were locked away, with Christ holding the keys to death and hell.

I just love the idea that salvation is not something we achieve here so that we get a "Get Out Of Hell Free" card, allowing us to pity the poor souls who weren't as fortunate or smart as we. There is something so awful about this idea, and here Wesley tells us that, quite simply, salvation is for all - including those slaved of hell.

Thank you, again, Rich, for posting these hymns.

Rich Holton said...

Thanks, Geoffrey.

I remember my seminary theology professor talking about the "Harrowing of Hell". Although I haven't had time to study it in detail, the Wikipedia article on the topic has some good basic information.

I certainly hope that this doctrine is true--or at least a better reflection of the truth than that offered by much of so-called "evangelical Christianity".